Recent Posts from all WXXI Blogs

WXXI has many active bloggers.  See the menu to the left to navigate to specific blogs!

Facebook is evil?

My friend Carl Pultz pointed me to The Idler’s website. Tom Hodgkinson (a.k.a “The Idler”) writes about his efforts to -- as he beautifully puts it -- “return dignity to the art of loafing.” But I don’t believe Tom is a great idler. He’s too productive. His recent article about Facebook in The Guardian newspaper is long and well researched. It explains why Tom despises Facebook, the online social networking site with 59 million current users and 2 million new ones each week.

»

facebook is evil

I was going to write a blog today that started with the line, “facebook is evil.”

But I need more time on that subject. Check back later.

Instead, here's an interesting news item about the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra.

Less than 1 percent of the repertory that orchestras played last year was composed by a black or Latino composer. The RPO has joined a new, national consortium of orchestras to commission major orchestral works from minority composers.

It’s enigmatically named the Sphinx Commissioning Consortium.

Read more here:

http://crainsdetroit.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080128...

»

If I Could Change One Thing

WXXI's annual Kids Who Write are Bright writing contest for students in grades K-12 is underway, with this year's topic being "If I Could Change One Thing." From now until April 10, the contest deadline, WXXI's education department will receive hundreds of entries ranging from picture entries from the very young to thought essays from high school students.

The one thing that all of these submissions will have in common is the heartfelt desire for change of some sort from the writer. In general, it certainly seems that change is in the air.

»

Reactionaries

On Saturday night, the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra opened with Fantasia on an Ostinato by John Corigliano, a short piece based on a famous repetitive passage by Ludwig van Beethoven (the second movement of Symphony No. 7.)

I loved it, but others reacted differently.

A Rochester blogger who went to the concert with her husband wrote,

»

Days are where we live

I’ve been busier than usual at work and pretty happy about it.

This week I filed a feature story for NPR, interviewed guitarist Sharon Isbin, and listened to about forty audio tributes to homicide victims. The last thing was not at all fun, and I still have ten more to go. I’m preparing to interview photographer Will Yurman, who spent 2007 documenting the lives of all the murder victims in a single year in Rochester, NY.

Imagine. Everytime someone was murdered, Will drove his gear to the neighborhood, the house, the cemetery.

Watching people talk about death for hours on end brought to my mind this short Philip Larkin poem: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2bNl91MrQo

Will Yurman’s multimedia project is here:

»

Drug Dealer on Broad Street

People who know me, know I'm rarely early to anything. Punctual, yes. Late, sometimes. Early, nope.

But WDKX's Liz Medhin and I finished up shooting a promo for Brizard: Square One in record time yesterday (despite a few extra takes - all my fault) and I hit all the green lights going over to the Democrat & Chronicle offices for a meeting. The parking gods were on my side, guiding me to an open spot not too far from the front door. Heck, I had 15 minutes to kill.

I decided to stay in the car for a few of them. I didn't expect it to be a particularly insightful experience; I just didn't feel like feeding the meter any more nickels than I had to.

But then I saw him. The drug dealer on Broad Street.

»

Review time

“She sang equally well lying on her back or kneeling atop her lover. This technique reduced Masetto to an obedient puppy – and probably many Eastman Theatre patrons as well.”
- the D & C’s Stuart Low, writing about Mercury Opera’s recent production of Don Giovanni

What do you want to read about in a review? Background info on the musicians? What about the hall, the crowds, or the color of the conductor’s hair? Critics debate about this stuff all the time. Some say they should stick to the music and only the music. Others want to capture the flavors, sights, and smells of the hall.

»

Many New Adjustments

We are making many new adjustments to the site. As a result something that may have worked one way before could start to work differently. If you run into any unusual problems that surprise you, please use our Contact page and let us know or add a Comment directly to this post.

»

Cracking the Joseph Schwantner Code

I’ve been trying to cozy up to Joseph Schwantner’s music in preparation for an hour-long, national special I’m producing about the composer. But it’s been harder than I expected, and recent blogs I’ve read about approaching classical music from the outside give me new sympathy for those who can’t drum up much enthusiasm for it.

»

My mildly desultory life

The problem with reading so much is that I can never remember where I read what. Or did I hear it on NPR? I can only guess. I guess that I read in Time magazine that 65% of Americans are on a diet. So, since popularity (a phenomenon quite removed from the actual merit of anything, I read somewhere) drives me in the opposite direction of any activity, I recently decided to emulate the life of composer Darius Milhaud, who (I read somewhere) lived a mildly desultory life. I like the sound of “mildly desultory.” Sounds like a plan. Or not a plan, which, when everyone else is sweating it out, sounds appealingly contrary. So I’ve settled on becoming mildly desultory myself.

»