Blog Posts on Music

Recorded Sound: Phonograph and Discs

This is the second post in a series exploring the history of the technology used to record sound, and how advances in these technologies affected music.

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Steve Reich and Brad Lubman

Click here for a wide-ranging conversation about new music, religion, conducting, and cell phones with composer Steve Reich and conductor Brad Lubman. 

Wanted: Your Questions for Steve Reich

 

His music is maddening, wonderful, hypnotic, or repulsive. It depends on who you ask.

I love it.  How do you feel?

Steve Reich is coming to town.

Recorded Sound: Pre-phonograph

This is the first of a series of posts exploring the history of the technology used to record sound, and how advances in these technologies affected music.

»

Recorded Sound: An Introduction

In this series of blog posts we will explore the history of sound recording, and how the technological advances in this area have affected the music industry. From before Edison’s phonograph to today’s modern recording studios, it would be impossible to discuss every advance and its impact on music.

Meeting Miss Othmar

 

One of the greatest pleasures in my life is presenting music for you on Classical 91.5 FM.  But making music with other people offers a different kind of thrill, and this spring I’m loving the chance to sing with various chamber choirs, including Madrigalia and First Inversion. 

My last musical adventure plunged me into the pit. 

The Concordia Choir and the promise of living

The Concordia Choir is swinging through Rochester on a national tour later this month.  In this conversation with conductor and composer Dr. René Clausen, you'll hear about a wide range of topics related to singing, managing, and listening -- plus a lesson in how to breathe more deeply.

The dagger in his smile

There are bad relationships and there are Bad Relationships.  The MacBeths of Shakepeare's "Scottish Play" push the boundaries of evil, to say the least. This summer bass-baritone Eric Owens made his debut as the title character of Verdi's Shakespearean opera, with Melody Moore as his scheming wife.  During the Glimmerglass Festival, we sat down to talk about twisted love, ambition, treachery, murder, and the House of Cards.

Vespers of 1610

As promised, here's a conversation about Claudio Monteverdi's Vespers of 1610 with Deborah Fox of Pegasus Early Music and conductor Paul O'Dette. Why is the Vespers so extraordinary?  Why, if it's so amazing, is it rarely performed?  Why isn't it as famous as Handel's Messiah?  Paul and Deb answer these questions and touch on the raw emotional power of the work in our conversation.  I'm thrilled you'll be able to hear this on the radio, thanks to Deborah Fox and recording engineer Carl Pultz of Alembic Productions.  Hear the Vespers Monday, November 2 at 8 p.m. on Classical 91.5 and FM 90.3, streaming at wxxi.org.  ~ Brenda

Vespers of 1610

Thank you for your support for Classical 91.5 during our fall membership campaign.  Behind the scenes, we are planning all kinds of special broadcasts on WXXI-FM, including Pegasus Early Music performing Monteverdi's Vespers of 1610, recorded in concert at the Hochstein Performance Hall this past spring.