Mona Seghatoleslami's blog

Copland Summer: Simplicity and Objectivity

So many things running around my head this afternoon, and I’m not sure how to organize them all. Maybe a list? 

Art Interlude

Wall \ Therapy at the Little Theatre

Copland summer reading is going well, and I'll post an update next week on what I'm learning. I'm not sure if this will lead to any grander conclusions that I so optimistically predicted last week, but I'm having a lot of fun reading about Copland's life - where and how he lived and worked, along with his connections with other musicians, artists, and writers. 

Enough - this post is not about Copland - instead, it's about a project that was completed in fewer hours than it will take me to read that book: the Wall\Therapy mural at The Little Theatre.  

Copland Summer

A few friends sat on a porch in Rochester on a recent cool summer night.  There was music, and beer, and some talk of going hiking. The music varied as different people used Spotify to play Nick Waterhouse, Leonard Cohen, Olivia Tremor Control, Wilco, and whatever else came to mind.

Late at night, late enough to be almost early, one of the denizens of this porch called up Copland’s music for The Red Pony. He then turned to me, the ostensible classical music expert, and asked:  “Why do I like this music? What makes it so good?”

Marian McPartland at the Movies - Director interview

Pianist Marian McPartland is a familiar and beloved presence on public radio stations across the country, due to her long-running program Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz. Documentary filmmaker Huey spent four years chronicling McPartland's life and music, including the radio show and her compositions in the film In Good Time, The Piano Jazz of Marian McPartland.

Esperanza Spalding's Radio Music Society in Rochester

Radio static in the dark. A bandstand shaped like a boom box. Sounds of different stations as this radio wandered the dial. The shadows of the band creating these radio sounds.

Then Esperanza Spalding strolled out onto the stage of Kodak Hall of Eastman Theatre, where she played bass, sang, and led her band through Saturday night's musical journey as part of the Xerox International Rochester Jazz Festival.

Philip Glass on the River in NYC

Composer Philip Glass turns 75 this year, and his birthday is being celebrated with concerts throughout the year, and even a singalong

Nicholas DiCarlo, a friend from West Virginia living in New York City, posted an invitation to a free, outdoor Philip Glass retrospective along the river in Rockefeller Park on Wednesday. I couldn't make it across the state to join him, but he kindly shared his pictures from the concert and wrote up a few thoughts.

Viola After Dark - Saturday Night Fever

Violist and composer Kenji Bunch payed tribute to Robin Gibb with his last selection on the Viola After Dark concert last Saturday night at the Miller Center during the International Viola Congress in Rochester. The video below is too awesome to keep secret: 

Viola-mania

Got viola?

As I walked over to Eastman this morning to get some (iced) coffee, I saw a number of people with instrument cases. This week, of all times, I felt pretty safe in assuming that these cases were holding violas, and not violins.

Opera...in Space!

This weekend, I went to Illinois to see Paradises Lost, by Stephen Andrew Taylor, with a libretto by Marcia Johnson, based on a novella Ursula K. Leguin.

Science fiction opera! I'm so excited that two different things that I love (reading science fiction and listening to opera), have come together.

"One Woman, a World of Music" - Flutist Rhonda Larson

Flutist Rhonda Larson combines her classical training with the wide range of musical inspirations she discovered while performing and traveling with the Paul Winter Consort.

Syndicate content