Scott Regan's blog

If I had a radio show...

If you have ever listened to Bob Dylan's Theme Radio Hour (on some other radio network...), you know he can be quick and funny with his comments. Thank you Brian, for compiling these little teasers into the thoughts, or, intuitive connections Mr. Dylan makes between songs each week on his show.

Now, if I had a radio show...
...and who is Brian?

From the Theme Time Radio Hour Show

One-Liners

"Hope all you listeners won't accuse me of cronyism just because I occasionally play records by people I know."

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Drawing Eric

The comforting voice of Eric Bibb. Songs of social grace and justiceEric BibbEric Bibb. An interesting conversation that piqued my interest about Roy Bucannan. And just a couple sketches.

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Venues, continued...

Venues present themselves like creatures of the night. They get made-up, or don’t, wash up a bit, or not, display darkness and light in codes their customers are lured toPor VidaPor Vida.

It’s all about attitude. It was the Molotov Lounge. Austin in March of 2007.

Bikers, aggressive punks, music critics, folk music fans, feminists, the generally rebellious. They filled this place. I swear in one of the only two booths was a Midwestern family, kids and all. Inside a rather threatening room, what could have brought together such a wildly diverse crowd.

It was Michelle Shocked.

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Venues, part one

One of the most remarkable shows I’ve ever seen was in a punk bar in Austin, 2007. It looked like the inside of an old diner stripped of anything and everything. What could have once been a lunch counter was the bar. No windows, just vacant spaces inside empty window frames.

It looked like a fire had gutted the downstairs of structures and function, then been splashed with dull, black paint to remove any remaining color.

Not the sort of place you would imagine a most memorable show happeningEric Taylor album artEric Taylor album art.

The performer was Michelle Shocked. Sally Timms opened. The venue became part of the show in a way no other venue would have worked.

I’ll get back to that show later.

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When the past is looped over the present

Each performance space played a significant role in that particular show’s experience. From the cold, grey Austin Music Hall, to the sunny tented patios, and pulsing honky-tonks. The final show I saw was in the quiet sanctuary of a church.

Jacob GoldinJacob Goldin In order to assure a seat for the featured sets later, we needed to wait nearly an hour for the first of three songwriters, Josh Goldin. The doors opened early making the wait pretty painless.

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The Show Is the Rainbow

One half of the Rochester contingent was at the Continental Club in South Austin on Saturday afternoon. It was 90 degrees and sunny. We had walked across the bridge over the Colorado River which runs right through Austin. Not that Colorado River, I was told. Without an atlas handy, I had to believe it to be true.

The line to get in the Continental Club was fairly long. We had probably already missed the Mother Truckers whom I had looked forward to since last year, and Steve Poltz, who I found out later was someone not to miss. Rather than wait in line, we continued walking in the sun.

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Just a Little Lovin'

The Austin Music Hall had great security. Ready for any emergency. They promptly removed the half of turkey club I had saved from earlier that evening. I should have considered throwing it away hours ago.

It was a compromise going to the Austin Music Hall. One thing that makes SXSW special is the small, club venues. The Music Hall (capacity 4,400) is larger, even larger than La Zona Rosa (700) where Van Morrison had played two nights before. It was almost full. Crowds shoulder to shoulder standing on the floor space. We went to the second level to sit on one of the concrete slabs that also serve as stairsshelby lynneshelby lynne.

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Don't Tell My Friends

Known for its great Mexican restaurants and Texas bar-b-ques, Austin also is home to one Disney-like New York Deli. Time and convenience finds me eating a turkey club on rye, deli style. I can’t confess this to anyone.The Leg ManThe Leg Man

(Great connoisseurs of eclectic music also appreciate fine local cuisine. The large bar-b-qued turkey leg, for instance. Rochester's own Richard Storm is such a man.)

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Age Meets Beauty: Songwriters on Parade

It’s a short hike down 6th Street, across town to Waterloo Records. Ninety degrees, sunny. Pass Mother Egan’s Irish Pub, already into Friday’s music at just past noon.

Waterloo hosts multiple bands throughout each festival. My niece Kate’s favorite in 2007 was catching Iggy Pop and the Stooges there in full glory, autograph and all. We were on our way to see Shelby Lynne.

It was forty minutes early. The crowd was active but sparse. Ten minutes later people began staking out their territory and it filled up. I planted myself right in the “S” section. Paul Simon, Nina Simone, Frank Sinatra. Plenty to check out while waiting.

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Kate's Take, day four

The final day of South By Southwest viewed from a foot below:

"It's the end of the tour" Last day. I've already seen so much great music this week, I'm inured and ready to start passing judgment on anyone and everyone. Unfortunately, the spring break crowd is returning tonight, and the clash of the SxSW crowd with the usual Sixth Street bunch is never pretty. Fortunately, there's a number of pleasant and random surprises.

Gina Lee and the Brisket Boys: (Botticelli's) Two-stepping country band, local regulars down at the Broken Spoke. Very funny commentary throughout by the guy on keyboards. Couples are dancing, interrupting lunch service. Very nice.

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