Brahms

That world-famous tenor you might run into in the frozen food section

Fresh from Athens and just a few days after singing Mahler's Das Lied Von Der Erde at Carnegie Hall, tenor Gregory Kunde (who lives in Rochester) will pick up a baton on November 1 at St. Anne Church and conduct Brahms' German Requiem. If you've never seen him sing, here's his performance of Bellini's "A te o cara" from I Puritani.

Translation: To you, oh dear one, love at times lead me furtively and in tears; now it guides me to your side in joy and exultation. At the radiance of such a beautiful hour if I remember my torment, it redoubles my happiness, and I cherish my heart’s beating.

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A Brahmsian Scoop

The recent post on Jon Nakamatsu's new Brahms CD sparked this revelation from violinist Edward Klorman,
Executive Director and Co-Artistic director of the summer's Canandaigua Lake Chamber Music Festival. He writes,

"We're not officially announcing the summer programs for a few months, but I'll let you in on a secret... Juliana [Athayde] and Jon are indeed playing Brahms, the Sonata for Violin and Piano in G major, Op. 78. It's an extremely tender work, and they'll play it beautifully together. The finale quotes Brahms' famous "Regenlied"(Rain Song), and this concert is all about music inspired by water. As for the rest of the program, well, I'll tell you more later on!"

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A subtly shifting balance

I have always loved Johannes Brahms’s clarinet sonatas Nos. 1 & 2 and was therefore delighted to see pianist Jon Nakamatsu’s name on a new recording of these works with another h-less Jon's, clarinetist Jon Manasse's.

In Sunday’s New York Times, James Oestreich describes the appeal of the Brahms thus: “the clarinet and the piano are thoroughly, sensuously intertwined in a subtly shifting balance.” If you listen, you'll know exactly what he means.

(Scroll down for the full review here: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/13/arts/music/13reco.html?_r=...)

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