WXXI Classical Blog

How hot is your Bartok?

I’m constantly inspired by WXXI listeners!   Your comments, memories, and observations about music are like signposts, pointing me in new directions.  Your creativity is infectious, and your support kindles the best ideas. 

A season of change

"Love cannot express the idea of music, while music may give an idea of love." 

What I did during my summer vacation

So ends the busiest, most inspirational summer of my adult life!  In the last three months, I’ve been privileged to walk through St. Mark’s Cathedral in Venice, to watch otters swimming in the St. Lawrence River, and to hear barihunk Nathan Gunn singing “Home on the Range” at the Glimmerglass Festival.

Five smooth stones

My Houghton friend Brad Wilber, who runs a blog predicting future Metropolitan Opera productions, has been asked to STOP.  This is very interesting.  Read more.

 

Mostly dead is slightly alive

Syracuse University officials fed a miracle pill to the city's dead Symphony, and they say that with love and care, it may revive soon.  Read the latest here.  Meanwhile, troubles began in Montreal, and New York City Opera

Minnesota postcard

Hello from Moorhead, Minnesota!  Enjoy Carl Pultz's company in the mornings on Classical 91.5 while I attend a music conference at Concordia College, right across the street from the cemetery that inspired the name of the radio show, "A Prairie Home Companion." 

 

So what's with the Robo Announcers during the middle of the day?

WXXI-FM 91.5 has received multiple calls and e-mails this week asking about the "robo announcers" during the middle of the day this week. 

Who said Classical music is dead? Check out this festival of living composers - all under 40!

The 21st century is bringing with it a whole new generation of composers who are actively writing and performing classical music.

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News and views

You may see less arts coverage in the Democrat and Chronicle. The daily paper’s classical music, jazz and dance reporter and critic, Anna Reguero, is leaving to pursue her doctorate in musicology.  (You can hear our conversation about changes she’s seen in Rochester by clicking here.)  She will not be replaced.  In a city with a widespread affinity for music of all kinds, the decision by Rochester’s daily paper to not hire a new music writer is troubling but not surprising.