Noteworthy Moments in Women's History 2012

Noteworthy Moments in Women's History 2012

Airing throughout March on WXXI Radio

L-R: WXXI's Elissa Orlando, Rachel Ward, and Teej Jenkins

WXXI's Elissa Orlando, Rachel Ward, and Teej Jenkins present a series of vignettes that highlight a few of the many remarkable women in American History.

Since 1979 the month of March has been recognized as Women’s History Month, celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future. This year, WXXI will again observe Women’s History Month with a series of vignettes that highlight a few of the many remarkable women in American History. (Listen to the 2011 series here)

This year, Noteworthy Moments in Women’s History will include Belva Ann Lockwood, the first woman admitted to practice law before the U.S. Supreme Court; Lillian D. Wald, public-health nursing advocate; Kate Gleason, the first woman admitted to Cornell University’s mechanical engineering program; Ida Wells-Barnett, journalist, suffragist and friend of Susan B. Anthony; and Mary Stafford Anthony, Susan’s younger sister.

Noteworthy Moments in Women’s History are presented by Elissa Orlando, WXXI Vice President for Television; Teej Jenkins, host of WXXI’s Assignment the World; and Rachel Ward, Editor of the WXXI Innovation Trail.

The series will begin on Thursday, March 8, International Women’s Day, and will air throughout the month of March at varying times of day on WXXI-AM 1370, WXXI-FM 91.5, WXXI-HD, WXXY-FM 90.3 and WRUR-FM 88.5.

Noteworthy Moments in Women’s History
were written by:

Listen to the series:


International Women’s Day
The United Nations gave March 8 official recognition as International Women’s Day in 1975, the first Year of the Woman.

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Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell
Intrigued by challenge, Elizabeth Backwell graduated from Geneva Medical College in Geneva, New York, becoming the first woman to receive an M.D. degree from an American medical school.

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Ida Wells-Barnett
Born a slave in 1862 Mississippi, Ida Wells-Barnett became a journalist and began writing about the horrific practice of lynching.

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Belva Ann Lockwood
The first woman was admitted to practice law before the U.S. Supreme Court on March 3, 1879.

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Kate Gleason
Inspired by family friend Susan B. Anthony, Kate Gleason was the first woman to be admitted to Cornell University’s mechanical engineering program.

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Rhoda DeGarmo
An activist, abolitionist, suffragist and organizer, Rhoda DeGarmo was one of the most courageous people in Rochester’s human-rights efforts.

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Blanche Stuart Scott
At the turn of the 20th century, Blanche Stuart Scott became a local celebrity as Rochester’s only female driver, and later became a stunt flier on the aerial exhibition circuit.

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Mary Stafford Anthony
Although she was seven years younger than her more famous sister, Mary Stafford Anthony, developed an interest in women’s rights three years before Susan B Anthony.

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Mary Hannick
Mary Florence Hannick dedicated all 102 years of her life to the service of others, and passed away last year on September 30th.

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Lillian D. Wald
Lillan Wald spent all of her adult life working as a champion of the poor, and carried the message of public-health nursing to Canada, Europe, Russia, and Mexico.

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Listen to the 2011 Series

 

 

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