From the President

 

Jane and Larry Glazer loved this community, and touched so many lives.

They loved this community and their loss will be deeply felt by so many of us, whose lives they touched. 

It’s been a very difficult week in Rochester as we mourn the first police officer killed in the line of duty in 55 years, along with the tragic deaths of Jane and Larry Glazer in the crash of their small plane.

WXXI News has been covering these events, keeping our community informed and helping our community cope with the loss of Officer Pierson and the Glazers. Officer Pierson gave his life protecting this city.  Although the Glazers died in an accident, they were people who believed in the future of Rochester.  I doubt that the Glazers and Officer Pierson knew each other, but I suspect they had something in common – a belief that this was a city worth fighting for. 

Here at WXXI it’s been a particularly sad week.  Jane and Larry Glazer were good friends and dedicated members of the WXXI/Little Board of Trustees. 

If you knew Larry, you understood that his Buckingham Properties group always looked for the difficult projects, ones that others might pass on.  Larry was committed to the future of Rochester and wanted to make a difference.   He was one of the strongest supporters of WXXI’s affiliation with the Little Theatre.  He thought it would be good for the East End cultural district, for the city, and for both organizations.

Jane Glazer also owned a major local business, QCI Direct.  She was scheduled to be inducted into the Rochester Business Hall of Fame next month.  They were both successful business people and community leaders.

They were quiet philanthropists, contributing to many worthy causes and serving on the boards of numerous local organizations.  Their appreciation for WXXI and the Little Theatre was expressed by their Co-Chairing our “Go Public” Campaign. They believed in the future of Rochester, whether it was taking on another ambitious downtown real estate project, as Larry often did, or expanding a business in Rochester and keeping the jobs here, as Jane did.

As a friend of Larry’s told me, “they always had time for every place and everyone.” 

»

More Recent Messages

Thank you to those who contacted the Governor's Office and our local delegation in support of public broadcasting!

I never thought I’d breathe a sigh of relief about “only” a 20% reduction in State operating aid, but given the alternative – a proposed 50% cut – it was the best for which we could have hoped.
»

Your support is being used wisely

April marks the beginning of spring and the scheduled end of the New York State budget process.  Both could benefit from more sunshine.
»

A Monthly Message from the President, March 2009

If you’re a new member of WXXI (especially if you joined during our recent radio membership campaign), let me extend a warm welcome to the WXXI family!  You join more than 27,000 others who voluntarily contribute to WXXI to keep our station a strong, independent voice for the Rochester community.  Listenership to our radio services, especially news and public affairs, is stronger than ever.
»

Congress may delay the DTV Transition date

As I write this month’s letter, it appears that the new President and Congress may delay the planned end of analog television broadcasting scheduled for February 17. This is in large part a response to the federal government running out of coupons to help over-the-air television viewers purchase digital converter boxes. It’s a problem that needs to be addressed. It is also a reaction to finding out how important free over-the-air television is to so many people in the country, especially in rural areas and the inner city. We’ll continue to provide the latest information about the transition on television, radio and online, especially since the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) selected WXXI to help lead the community education effort about the transition to digital TV. You can read more about the FCC contract we were awarded on this highlight page or on page 5 of the February Guide (PDF).
»