From the President

 

Celebrating 50 Years of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

February marks the 50th anniversary of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. On February 19, 1968 the show premiered on WXXI-TV and on PBS stations across the country. The series changed the landscape of children’s educational television forever as Fred Rogers brought his warm and heartfelt messages to millions of young viewers. The lessons and stories he shared have proven to be timeless – as meaningful and valuable in today’s world as they were in the past.

To start the anniversary celebration WXXI will present a week of back-to-back episodes of Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood and Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood beginning February 26th. We’ll air special episodes of Daniel Tiger at 9:30 a.m., followed by the episodes of Mister Rogers that inspired them. We invite you to join our celebration by sharing your memories of Fred Rogers on WXXI’s Facebook and Twitter accounts using the hashtag #WXXIandMisterRogers.

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