THE LITTLE THEATRE’S “ONE TAKE: STORIES THROUGH THE LENS” SERIES PRESENTS “BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME”

Release Date: 
Thu, 04/11/2013

WXXI Public Broadcasting

280 State Street. PO Box 30021

Rochester, New York 14603-3021

585/325-7500

 

wxxi.org

Kristin Tutino, Publicist: 585/258-0253

 

For Immediate Release                                                                                   
Contact: Kristin Tutino, ktutino@wxxi.org, (585) 258-0253/259-5884

(Rochester, New York) April 11, 2013 – The Little Theatre’s “One Take: Stories Through the Lens,” a monthly series that features a unique mix of documentaries followed by group discussions, presents BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME on Tuesday, May 21 at 7 p.m. This feature-length documentary takes a look at the dismal commercial failure, subsequent massive critical acclaim, and enduring legacy of pop music's greatest cult phenomenon, Big StarIt will be followed by a discussion with the director, Drew DeNicola, via Skype. Tickets are $10 and available at the door. This “One Take” film is sponsored by Record Archive.

About “BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME”:
BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME is a feature-length documentary about legendary Memphis band Big Star. While mainstream success eluded them, Big Star’s three albums have become critically lauded touchstones of the rock music canon. A seminal band in the history of alternative music, Big Star has been cited as an influence by artists including REM, The Replacements, Belle & Sebastian, Elliot Smith and Flaming Lips, to name just a few. With never-before-seen footage and photos of the band, in-depth interviews and a rousing musical tribute by the bands they inspired, BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME is a story of artistic and musical salvation. 

Among many ardent music fans and critics the band, Big Star, is widely regarded as one of the greatest bands in rock history. Never experiencing popular success in their time; even today their greatest notoriety is from their song, “In the Street” the title theme for the Fox sitcom, That 70s Show. But despite their unique distinction of being famous for not being famous, today Big Star’s influence can be heard in the music of artists as diverse as R.E.M., The Replacements, Wilco, Beck, Jeff Buckley and Elliot Smith, just to name a few.

BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME traces the origins and history of the legendary band from the late sixties with lead singer Alex Chilton sky-rocketing to stardom at the age of sixteen with The Box Tops and their #1 hit, “The Letter” to the serendipitous meeting of Chilton and local Memphis singer-songwriter-guitarist, Chris Bell; through the tumultuous recording of the group’s three landmark albums, #1 Record, Radio City and Third/Sister Lovers (Ardent Records); culminating with their implosion due to failed record sales, personal breakdowns and the tragic death of Chris Bell in 1978.

About the “One Take: Stories Through the Lens” series:
Hosted by Linda Moroney, this monthly series presents a unique mix of documentaries—ranging from film festival favorites to unheralded gems—followed by talkback discussions. The films are held at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month, and tickets are $10, unless otherwise noted. “One Take” is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. 

About the series programmer, Linda Moroney:
Linda Moroney has been active in the independent film community for over 15 years. Films she’s produced have shown theatrically, been broadcast nationally, and screened at numerous film festivals worldwide. She is the Greentopia | FILM Director, the Founder of the Rochester Documentary Group, and programmer for “One Take: Stories Through the Lens,” a monthly documentary series at the historic Little Theatre. Currently, she is producing and directing the feature-length documentary, THE STORYBOOK PROJECT (working title), with Crystal Pix.  She was the Managing Director/Programmer for the 360 | 365 Film Festival (2010 and 2011 editions).  In 2007, Linda was the curator for Animated Jazz Shorts from The Hubley Studio, which was a co-presentation by the Rochester International Jazz Festival, Rochester/High Falls Film Festival, and George Eastman House.  Linda cut her filmmaking teeth working with Academy Award winner, Faith Hubley, on six of her animated films.  In addition, Linda was the Associate Producer on the independent feature-length documentary, RAM DASS FIERCE GRACE named by Newsweek magazine as one of the five best non-fiction films of 2002, and broadcast nationally on PBS (Independent Lens) in 2004.  She has produced several other short films including Emily Hubley’s award-winning SET SET SPIKE (2001), which was an official selection in the 2002 Sundance Film Festival. She is the Co-Founder of the Rochester Teen Film Festival and the Rochester Teen Film Camp.


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The Little Theatre opened in 1929 and established not-for-profit status in 1998. The non-profit screens more than 100 American independent and foreign films for the greater Rochester community each year. It also hosts a varied slate of art shows, film festivals and series, and music throughout the year. The Little provides filmmakers, local musicians, and fine artists a professional space to share their visions with a diverse audience and to discuss their work through educational talkbacks.

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