History Detectives: Cromwell Dixon, Bartlett Sketchbook, Duke Ellington Plates on WXXI-TV

History Detectives: Cromwell Dixon, Bartlett Sketchbook, Duke Ellington Plates on WXXI-TV

Mon, 07/19/2010 - 9:00pm - 10:00pm

"Bartlett Sketchbook": Jeremy Rowe of Mesa, AZ want History Detectives to find out whether this sketchbook belonged to J.R. Bartlett. If it did, this sketchbook illustrates the journey of the first ever US – Mexican border survey.

Credit: Ann Suckow

History Detectives takes a visit to the Glenn H. Curtiss Museum in Hammondsport, NY.

In this History Detectives episode, airing Monday, July 19 at 9 p.m. on WXXI-TV,  a contributor has a four by three inch swatch of fabric she found among her late grandfather’s possessions.  On it are written the words “Dixon” and “Grand Island, 1911.”  She wonders if the name refers to the pioneering aviator, Cromwell Dixon.  Reporters called Dixon the “Boy Genius” pilot.  At 19 years old, Dixon was the first man to fly across the Continental Divide. Two days later he crashed at an exhibition in Spokane, Washington.  He died a few hours later.  Could this piece of fabric be the last remaining artifact of Cromwell Dixon’s brief aviation career?  History Detective host Elyse Luray goes up in a plane to see the world from Cromwell’s perspective.  She talks with a Cromwell Dixon biographer, consults with the curator at the Glenn H. Curtiss Museum, and finally comes across a key clue at the Stuhr Museum in Grand Island, Nebraska.

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